Olympic Sculpture Park

Olympic Sculpture Park is a public park affiliated with the Seattle Art Museum (SAM). It’s located a short walk from Seattle Center near the waterfront. Admission is free and the park is open 365 days a year.

Olympic Sculpture Park in Seattle, Washington

Olympic Sculpture Park

The park was once a contaminated industrial site, but the Seattle Art Museum transformed it into a green space to display public art. It opened in 2007.

 

PACCAR Pavilion

The main building is the PACCAR Pavilion. Inside, there’s a snack bar and seating area and it’s often used as an event venue.

PACCAR Pavilion at Olympic Sculpture Park in Seattle, Washington

PACCAR Pavilion

Interior of PACCAR Pavilion at Olympic Sculpture Park in Seattle, Washington

Interior of PACCAR Pavilion

Interior of PACCAR Pavilion at Olympic Sculpture Park in Seattle, Washington

Interior of PACCAR Pavilion

 

Olympic Sculpture Park

There is a path through the park that leads to a stairway at the end of Broad Street. Along it are about 20 works of art.

Olympic Sculpture Park in Seattle, Washington

Olympic Sculpture Park

Olympic Sculpture Park in Seattle, Washington

Olympic Sculpture Park

The most prominent is Eagle by Alexander Calder, which was dedicated in 1974 and originally stood in Fort Worth, Texas. Another that caught my eye is a stainless steel tree called Split (2003) by Roxy Paine.

Eagle by Alexander Calder at Olympic Sculpture Park in Seattle, Washington

Eagle by Alexander Calder

Split by Roxy Paine at Olympic Sculpture Park in Seattle, Washington

Split by Roxy Paine

Across the bridge, which is an art installation called Seattle Cloud Cover (Teresita Fernández, 2006), there are stairs down to a small plaza near the waterfront. There, you can see a fountain called Father and Son (2005) and Eye Benches I, II and III (1996-97), both by Louise Bourgeois. There’s also a giant head called Echo (2011) by Jaume Plensa, who designed Crown Fountain in Millennium Park in Chicago.

Seattle Cloud Cover by Teresita Fernández at  Olympic Sculpture Park in Seattle, Washington

Seattle Cloud Cover by Teresita Fernández

Father and Son (background) and Eye Benches I, II and III (foreground), both by Louise Bourgeois at Olympic Sculpture Park in Seattle, Washington

Father and Son (background) and Eye Benches I, II and III (foreground), both by Louise Bourgeois

Echo by Jaume Plensa at Olympic Sculpture Park in Seattle, Washington

Echo by Jaume Plensa

 

Pier 70

Next to the stairs is Pier 70, which has been converted into office and retail space with restaurants. It was the location of the house for The Real World: Seattle (1998).

Pier 70 in Seattle, Washington

Pier 70

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