Casa Rosada

Casa Rosada (Pink House) is the presidential palace of Argentina. It was built between 1862 and 1885 on the former site of Fuerte Viejo, the old fort of Buenos Aires. For many, the building is most famous for the time Eva Perón addressed her supporters from one of its balconies. It’s located on Plaza de Mayo.

Casa Rosada at Plaza de Mayo in Buenos Aires, Argentina

Casa Rosada

Casa Rosada on Plaza de Mayo in Buenos Aires, Argentina

Casa Rosada

Eva Perón's balcony at Casa Rosada on Plaza de Mayo in Buenos Aires, Argentina

Eva Perón’s balcony

With all of the police barricades, Casa Rosada looks like an intimidating place to approach. It’s actually surprisingly accessible. On Saturdays and Sundays, Casa Rosada is open to the public for free tours that last about one hour. I highly recommend doing one of the tours. Once you enter and pass through security, walk all the way to the back and take a number from one of the guides. I had to wait about 45 minutes for a tour, but it was well worth the wait.

The waiting room for the tours is called the Salón Patriotas. It features several paintings of prominent political figures from all over Latin America. Portraits of Che GuevaraSalvador Allende, and Eva Perón all stuck out to me.

Salón Patriotas at Casa Rosada on Plaza de Mayo in Buenos Aires, Argentina

Salón Patriotas

Salón Patriotas at Casa Rosada on Plaza de Mayo in Buenos Aires, Argentina

Salón Patriotas

Salón Patriotas at Casa Rosada on Plaza de Mayo in Buenos Aires, Argentina

Salón Patriotas

While waiting, I was also able to see Patio Malvinas and Patio de las Palmeras along with a chapel, Capillo de Cristo Rey. There are views of Patio de las Palmeras from the higher floors later in the tour.

Patio Malvinas at Casa Rosada on Plaza de Mayo in Buenos Aires, Argentina

Patio Malvinas

Patio de las Palmeras at Casa Rosada on Plaza de Mayo in Buenos Aires, Argentina

Patio de las Palmeras

Capilla de Cristo Rey at Casa Rosada on Plaza de Mayo in Buenos Aires, Argentina

Capilla de Cristo Rey

Once the tour begins, you have a few minutes to visit the Salón Pueblos Originarios. It tells the story of the indigenous people of Argentina with a few artifacts behind glass cases.

Salón Pueblos Originarios at Casa Rosada on Plaza de Mayo in Buenos Aires, Argentina

Salón Pueblos Originarios

Next, the tour went downstairs to the Salón Azul, the official reception room for foreign dignitaries. There are a few paintings on the wall by famous Argentinian painters.

Salón Azul at Casa Rosada on Plaza de Mayo in Buenos Aires, Argentina

Salón Azul

We went up to the 2nd floor to visit another reception room, Salón Martín Fierro, and the Salón Mujeres Argentinas, a conference hall dedicated to important Argentinian women.

Salón Martín Fierro at Casa Rosada on Plaza de Mayo in Buenos Aires, Argentina

Salón Martín Fierro

Salón Mujeres Argentinas at Casa Rosada on Plaza de Mayo in Buenos Aires, Argentina

Salón Mujeres Argentinas

Then, it was a quick look at Argentina’s “Wall of Fame” and a peek down into Patio del Aljibe.

Wall of Fame at Casa Rosada on Plaza de Mayo in Buenos Aires, Argentina

Wall of Fame

Patio del Aljibe at Casa Rosada on Plaza de Mayo in Buenos Aires, Argentina

Patio del Aljibe

We started to get into the highlights of the palace with a stop at the Patio de las Palmeras. It’s a very Spanish colonial-looking patio with a fountain and few of tall palm trees in the center. I was impressed by the doors and stained glass windows.

Patio de las Palmeras at Casa Rosada on Plaza de Mayo in Buenos Aires, Argentina

Patio de las Palmeras

Patio de las Palmeras at Casa Rosada on Plaza de Mayo in Buenos Aires, Argentina

Patio de las Palmeras

Patio de las Palmeras at Casa Rosada on Plaza de Mayo in Buenos Aires, Argentina

Patio de las Palmeras

Through the Salón de los Científicos Argentinos (Argentinian Scientists Room), we were able to go onto a balcony to see an incredible view of Plaza de Mayo.

Salón de los Científicos Argentinos at Casa Rosada on Plaza de Mayo in Buenos Aires, Argentina

Salón de los Científicos Argentinos

Salón de los Científicos Argentinos at Casa Rosada on Plaza de Mayo in Buenos Aires, Argentina

Salón de los Científicos Argentinos

Plaza de Mayo from a balcony at Casa Rosada on Plaza de Mayo in Buenos Aires, Argentina

Plaza de Mayo from a balcony at Casa Rosada

Next was the Salón Eva Perón. This was easily one of the most popular rooms on the tour because it held the furniture used by Eva Perón. The famous balcony from where she addressed the public is attached to this room but is not open to the public.

Salón Eva Perón at Casa Rosada on Plaza de Mayo in Buenos Aires, Argentina

Salón Eva Perón

Salón Eva Perón at Casa Rosada on Plaza de Mayo in Buenos Aires, Argentina

Salón Eva Perón

Salón Eva Perón at Casa Rosada on Plaza de Mayo in Buenos Aires, Argentina

Salón Eva Perón

Two important items to look out for in Salón Eva Perón are her dress in a glass case and a portrait of her and her husband, Juan Perón, before entering the room.

Dress of Eva Perón at Salón Eva Perón at Casa Rosada on Plaza de Mayo in Buenos Aires, Argentina

Dress of Eva Perón

Portrait of Juan and Eva Perón at Salón Eva Perón at Casa Rosada on Plaza de Mayo in Buenos Aires, Argentina

Portrait of Juan and Eva Perón

We were then led to the Salón Blanco, the room from where the president addresses the nation. It is one of the most beautiful and ornate rooms in the palace. Pay special attention to the mural on the ceiling.

Salón Blanco at Casa Rosada on Plaza de Mayo in Buenos Aires, Argentina

Salón Blanco

Salón Blanco at Casa Rosada on Plaza de Mayo in Buenos Aires, Argentina

Salón Blanco

Salón Blanco at Casa Rosada on Plaza de Mayo in Buenos Aires, Argentina

Salón Blanco

Salón Norte is connected to Salón Blanco. Meetings with the Cabinet of Ministers are held in this room.

Salón Norte at Casa Rosada on Plaza de Mayo in Buenos Aires, Argentina

Salón Norte

The tour concluded with a visit to the president’s office. I was not expecting to get this much access to the palace, so it was a nice surprise. No photos were allowed in the office so I can’t show you a picture. After this, we went down a exited through the Salón de los Bustos, a room containing the busts of the presidents of Argentina.

Salón de los Bustos at Casa Rosada on Plaza de Mayo in Buenos Aires, Argentina

Salón de los Bustos

A park to the east of Casa Rosada, Parque Colón, contains a monument to Christopher Columbus. Unfortunately, it was disassembled for repair at the time of my visit. You can get a good view of the park from Salón Pueblos Originarios at the beginning of the tour.

View of Parque Colón at Casa Rosada on Plaza de Mayo in Buenos Aires, Argentina

View of Parque Colón

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