Gori

The main reason I went to Gori was to visit the Joseph Stalin Museum. Outside of that, there isn’t much to see, but I took my time to discover what the town had to offer.

First, I paid a visit to the Gori Fortress, which has been in use since before the 7th century. I FROZE! It was winter, the ground was covered in snow, and yes, it was cold. But the wind up at the top made it brutally cold. The fortress looks interesting from street level but once I got to the top I realized there was nothing there.

Gori Fortress in Gori, Georgia

Gori Fortress

Gori Fortress in Gori, Georgia

Gori Fortress

Gori Fortress in Gori, Georgia

Gori Fortress

Gori Fortress in Gori, Georgia

Gori Fortress

After a while, it was so cold I thought I was going to lose a finger, but the views from the top were totally worth it!

View from Gori Fortress in Gori, Georgia

View from Gori Fortress

View from Gori Fortress with Gori Cathedral (left) in Gori, Georgia

View from Gori Fortress with Gori Cathedral (left)

View from Gori Fortress in Gori, Georgia

View from Gori Fortress

After the fortress, I went around the other side of the hill it’s on and visited a monument. It’s dedicated to a 12th century Georgian poet, Rustaveli.

Rustaveli monument in Gori, Georgia

Rustaveli monument

Rustaveli monument in Gori, Georgia

Rustaveli monument

The Gori Cathedral was nearby. I stuck around for part of the service and warmed up a bit before heading back out to the bitter cold.

Gori Cathedral in Gori, Georgia

Gori Cathedral

Gori Cathedral in Gori, Georgia

Gori Cathedral

Next was Stalin Park, which is the location of the Joseph Stalin Museum. Other than the museum, there’s a WWII memorial. Behind the WWII memorial is a new memorial to seven Georgian soldiers killed in Afghanistan.

Stalin Park in Gori, Georgia

Stalin Park

WWII memorial in Gori, Georgia

WWII memorial

WWII memorial in Gori, Georgia

WWII memorial

Afghanistan memorial in Gori, Georgia

Afghanistan memorial

Next to the memorials is the Great Patriotic War Museum (which I didn’t visit). From there, I decided I should head back to Tbilisi. On my walk back to the bus station, I passed Gori’s city hall and theatre.

Great Patriotic War Museum in Gori, Georgia

Great Patriotic War Museum

City hall in Gori, Georgia

City hall

Theatre in Gori, Georgia

Theatre

All in all, I spent about three hours in Gori. That’s all I really needed, although there are a few interesting things nearby that I would like to see (next time?). The marshrutka ride was just over an hour each way and it proved to be a very easy and worthwhile day trip. I was very happy I went.

A final note: the bus station is much less chaotic than the one in Tbilisi. The marshrutkas to Tbilisi are located on the curb furthest away from the bus station building. You buy a ticket from a man outside the marshrutka, get on, and give your ticket to the driver once you reach Tbilisi. Very simple. Marshrutkas leave frequently. I think I waited no longer than 20 minutes.

Bus station in Gori, Georgia

Bus station

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