Ogden

While Martin stayed back in Salt Lake City to catch up on some work, Gönül and I headed north of the city for the day. Our first stop was in Ogden for a quick look around.

Ogden was the first permanent settlement by people of European descent in Utah, founded in 1846 as Fort Buenaventura. It was bought by the Mormons a year later. It turned into a lawless frontier town and a major stop on the Transcontinental Railroad. The city is home to Weber State University, and attracts visitors because of its proximity to the mountains and outdoor recreation.

 

Historic 25th Street

We spent most of our time walking down historic 25th Street, which features several restaurants, shops, and art galleries. There are lots of renovated historic buildings along the street.

Historic 25th Street in Ogden, Utah

Historic 25th Street

Historic 25th Street in Ogden, Utah

Historic 25th Street

25th Street was the center of life in Ogden but was also a place known for all sorts of illegal activities, including gambling, prostitution, and drug deals. It’s believed that notorious gangster Al Capone once said Ogden was too wild for him.

Historic 25th Street in Ogden, Utah

Historic 25th Street

Historic 25th Street in Ogden, Utah

Historic 25th Street

 

Union Station

Three blocks make up historic 25th Street, ending at Union Station. Union Station is the home of art galleries and four different museums that can all be visited on one ticket. As of September 2016, US$5 for adults and US$3 for children gives admission to the Utah State Railroad Museum, John M. Browning Firearms Museum, Browning-Kimball Classic Car Museum, and Utah Cowboy and Western Heritage Museum. If we had more time, we would have visited these museums.

Historic 25th Street and Union Station in Ogden, Utah

Historic 25th Street and Union Station

 

Peery’s Egyptian Theatre

A building of interest just a short walk from 25th Street is Peery’s Egyptian Theatre. Located on Washington Boulevard, the 800 seat theatre was built in 1924 to play silent films. It was renovated and modernized over the years until it closed in 1984 and threatened with demolition. It was saved and reopened in 1997 and hosts plays, ballets, and live music as well as some events for the Sundance Film Festival. The theatre was one of less than 50 Egyptian-style theatres built in the country and remains one of only 12 or so that remain standing.

Peery's Egyptian Theatre in Ogden, Utah

Peery’s Egyptian Theatre

Peery's Egyptian Theatre in Ogden, Utah

Peery’s Egyptian Theatre

 

Grounds for Coffee

Before we left Ogden for Brigham City, we had a very good cappuccino at Grounds for Coffee. The friendly service was as good as the coffee, and we sat at a table outside to watch the people walk by.

Grounds for Coffee in Ogden, Utah

Grounds for Coffee

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