Pirámide

There’s absolutely nothing to do at Tierradentro or the town of San Andrés de Pisimbalá after the park closes at 4pm. So what are your options?

  1. Rest
  2. Take a trip to Pirámide

 

While visiting the tombs at Segovia, one of the park rangers asked us if we wanted to go on a trip to see a natural pyramid and a few other sites at 4pm. With nothing else to do, we accepted. It cost us COP$25,000 per person and we were picked up at our hotel, La Portada.

 

El Hato

Our first stop was El Hato, which is part of the archaeological park at Tierradentro but not on the hiking circuit. There are a couple unique monoliths that date back to the 2nd century. One depicts a frog and another a crocodile.

El Hato at Tierradentro, Cauca, Colombia

El Hato

Figure of a frog at El Hato at Tierradentro, Cauca, Colombia

Figure of a frog

Figure of a crocodile at El Hato at Tierradentro, Cauca, Colombia

Our group observing a figure of a crocodile

Figure of a crocodile at El Hato at Tierradentro, Cauca, Colombia

Figure of a crocodile

There’s also a huge hollowed out stone bowl but nobody knows what it was used for. Because there’s a small hole at the bottom, some believe that it was used to make chicha while others think it was a sacrificial stone.

Stone bowl at El Hato at Tierradentro, Cauca, Colombia

Stone bowl

 

Pirámide

Next, we drove to the entrance of Pirámide. We had to walk about 30 minutes uphill to get to the farm where it’s located. There, we paid COP$2,000 each to the owner to let us onto their property to see the rock formation.

Pirámide is a natural stone pyramid that can be climbed for incredible views of the countryside. It sits on the edge of a ridge with steep drops down to the bottom.

Pirámide near Inzá, Cauca, Colombia

Pirámide

Sitting on top of Pirámide near Inzá, Cauca, Colombia

Sitting on top of Pirámide

The view from the top of Pirámide near Inzá, Cauca, Colombia

The view from the top of Pirámide

Mysteriously, there are two tunnels that were carved into the bottom of Pirámide by the Spanish conquistadors. Nobody to this day knows why. Some speculate that it was to find gold or other precious minerals while others believe it was to build a church.

One of the tunnels at Pirámide near Inzá, Cauca, Colombia

One of the tunnels

Inside the tunnels, there are usually lights for visitors to enter, but the electricity was out during our visit. The guide lit the way with a flashlight and we were able to see bats and cave spiders along with a few carvings made in the rocks. One was a figure of a face and there was also a cross.

Inside a tunnel at Pirámide near Inzá, Cauca, Colombia

Inside a tunnel

A face carved into one of the tunnels at Pirámide near Inzá, Cauca, Colombia

A face carved into one of the tunnels

A cross carved on top of the entrance to a tunnel at Pirámide near Inzá, Cauca, Colombia

A cross carved on top of the entrance to a tunnel

After we left Pirámide, the guide drove us back to the hotel. The tour took about 2 ½ hours in total and it was an unexpectedly enjoyable time.

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