Barrio Yungay

Just west of Barrio Brasil in Santiago lies Barrio Yungay. I walked through the area after exploring Barrio Brasil. It seems to be much less explored than Barrio Brasil but has some architectural gems. The barrio did a great job on its official website (in Spanish only), explaining some of its highlights. You can immediately feel a change from Barrio Brasil. It seems to be the sketchier cousin of Barrio Brasil, so be a bit more alert here.

Coming from Barrio Brasil, I walked down Calle Compañia de Jesús to enter Barrio Yungay. There are several buildings covered in graffiti and street art. A few are good but for the most part the work isn’t nearly as creative as in other areas of the city.

Graffiti on Calle Compañía de Jesús in Barrio Yungay, Santiago de Chile

Graffiti on Calle Compañía de Jesús

Graffiti on Calle Compañía de Jesús in Barrio Yungay, Santiago de Chile

Graffiti on Calle Compañía de Jesús

Graffiti on Calle Compañía de Jesús in Barrio Yungay, Santiago de Chile

Graffiti on Calle Compañía de Jesús

Graffiti on Calle Compañía de Jesús in Barrio Yungay, Santiago de Chile

Graffiti on Calle Compañía de Jesús

One building of note is the Peluquería Francesa, an old French hairdresser. It is now Boulevard Lavaud, a restaurant.

Peluquería Francesa in Barrio Yungay, Santiago de Chile

Peluquería Francesa

About six blocks from Avenida Cumming on Compañia de Jesús are three incredible cités that seem extremely out of place in such an area. They were all constructed in the first half of the 20th century and are a close-knit block of beautiful homes. Some of the homes are run down and are undergoing restoration while others have already been restored. The first cité you will encounter is Pasaje Hurtado Rodríguez, built in 1926.

Pasaje Hurtado Rodríguez in Barrio Yungay, Santiago de Chile

Pasaje Hurtado Rodríguez

Pasaje Hurtado Rodríguez in Barrio Yungay, Santiago de Chile

Pasaje Hurtado Rodríguez

Pasaje Hurtado Rodríguez in Barrio Yungay, Santiago de Chile

Pasaje Hurtado Rodríguez

The next one is Pasaje Lucrecia Valdés, built in 1924. It’s the least restored cité of the three, but still has some impressive homes.

Pasaje Lucrecia Valdés in Barrio Yungay, Santiago de Chile

Pasaje Lucrecia Valdés

Pasaje Lucrecia Valdés in Barrio Yungay, Santiago de Chile

Pasaje Lucrecia Valdés

Pasaje Lucrecia Valdés in Barrio Yungay, Santiago de Chile

Pasaje Lucrecia Valdés

My favorite and the most beautiful cité is the third one, Pasaje Adriana Cousiño, built in 1937. It is the only one of the three that is pedestrian only. The middle of the entire street is full of lush greenery and palm trees, and on each side are homes that have had amazing restorations done.

Pasaje Adriana Cousiño in Barrio Yungay, Santiago de Chile

Pasaje Adriana Cousiño

Pasaje Adriana Cousiño in Barrio Yungay, Santiago de Chile

Pasaje Adriana Cousiño

Pasaje Adriana Cousiño in Barrio Yungay, Santiago de Chile

Pasaje Adriana Cousiño

Next, I walked back down Compañia de Jesús to Libertad and turned left. From there, it was a couple blocks to Plaza Yungay, the heart of the barrio. In the middle of the square is a monument to the Roto Chileno, the anonymous hero of the Battle of Yungay in 1839. About safety – there are certain times I’ve felt I shouldn’t be in an area, and this was one of them. I was extra careful here.

Plaza Yungay in Barrio Yungay, Santiago de Chile

Plaza Yungay

The most visible building on the square is the Iglesia de San Saturnino, built in 1844. It is closed for restoration for damage that occurred during the 2010 earthquake. Ironically, Saint Saturninus is Santiago’s patron saint for protection from earthquakes.

Iglesia de San Saturnino in Barrio Yungay, Santiago de Chile

Iglesia de San Saturnino

A couple blocks from Plaza Yungay, down Calle Cueto is Casa Ignacio Domeyko. It is a national monument built in 1848 by the Polish geologist and naturalized Chilean, Ignacy Domeyko.

Casa Ignacio Domeyko in Barrio Yungay, Santiago de Chile

Casa Ignacio Domeyko

At the next block, Catedral, I made a left and started walking toward the metro. There were two buildings of note along the way. The first was the Colegio de Profesores, and the second the Iglesia de los Capuchinos, built in 1861. Once I got to the corner with Avenida Cumming, I jumped on the metro and headed home for the day.

Colegio de Profesores in Barrio Yungay, Santiago de Chile

Colegio de Profesores

Iglesia de los Capuchinos in Barrio Yungay, Santiago de Chile

Iglesia de los Capuchinos

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