Askold’s Grave Park

Down the hill to the north of Slavy Park is Askold’s Grave Park, which is one of the many beautiful parks along the Dnipro River in Kiev. It was created in the 1930s by the Soviets and named after a legend that Prince Askold of Kiev was buried there in the 9th century. Askold was thought to be a grandson of legendary Viking Ragnar Lothbrok.

My first stop in the park was St. Andrew Square, where the small Chapel of St. Andrew is located. It was built in 2000 by the Ukrainian Orthodox Church (Moscow Patriarchate). Near the chapel is a cross that is called the Monument to the Victims of the 1933 Famine. Across the street is a statue of St. Andrew.

Chapel of St. Andrew at Askold's Grave Park in Kiev, Ukraine

Chapel of St. Andrew

Monument to the Victims of the 1933 Famine at Askold's Grave Park in Kiev, Ukraine

Monument to the Victims of the 1933 Famine

Statue of St. Andrew at Askold's Grave Park in Kiev, Ukraine

Statue of St. Andrew

Across the street from the chapel is a path leading to the Church of St. Nicholas the Miracle Worker. The church was built in 1809 as a Russian Orthodox church but is now a Ukrainian Greek Catholic church. I was shocked that I got yelled at when I entered because I crossed myself the Orthodox way as I would do in any church. I’ve never had that happen before in any church I’ve ever visited and it left a bad taste in my mouth. If you do choose to visit this church, just be careful crossing the street.

Church of St. Nicholas the Miracle Worker at Askold's Grave Park in Kiev, Ukraine

Church of St. Nicholas the Miracle Worker

Scattered around the church are a few monuments, including the Monument to the Heroes of Krut. It was dedicated to university students who fought against the Bolshevik forces in 1918.

Monument to the Heroes of Krut at Askold's Grave Park in Kiev, Ukraine

Monument to the Heroes of Krut

Monument at Askold's Grave Park in Kiev, Ukraine

Monument

Further along through the park’s paths are a restaurant and theatre.

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