Kom Ombo

As we cruised along the Nile, our first stop before after setting off from Aswan was Kom Ombo. We reached the temple early in the evening.

Approaching Kom Ombo on the Nile in Egypt

Approaching Kom Ombo on the Nile

Kom Ombo was a temple dedicated to the gods Horus and Sobek. It’s actually two temples in one, which was rare in the ancient Egyptian world. Construction began under Ptolemy VI Philometor around 150 BC and finished under Ptolemy XIII around 50 BC. What made the visit interesting for me is that we were able to visit the temple at night.

Temple of Kom Ombo, Egypt

Temple of Kom Ombo

Temple of Kom Ombo, Egypt

Temple of Kom Ombo

Temple of Kom Ombo, Egypt

Temple of Kom Ombo

Temple of Kom Ombo, Egypt

Temple of Kom Ombo

There were some very well preserved reliefs and hieroglyphics as we inspected the temple with our guide, Ramis.

Temple of Kom Ombo, Egypt

Temple of Kom Ombo

Temple of Kom Ombo, Egypt

Temple of Kom Ombo

Temple of Kom Ombo, Egypt

Temple of Kom Ombo

The most amazing section of the temple is a detailed ancient calendar indicating the Nile flood season and harvest season down to the days of each month. There was also a wall with hieroglyphics showing early medical tools, which weren’t much different than some simple medical tools used today.

Calendar at the Temple of Kom Ombo, Egypt

Calendar

Calendar at the Temple of Kom Ombo, Egypt

Calendar

Hieroglyphics showing medical tools at the Temple of Kom Ombo, Egypt

Hieroglyphics showing medical tools

Ramis pointed out a secret entrance for priests. He said the priests would speak to the common people from inside the chamber and it would echo as if the gods were speaking directly to them. There was also a pit where Cleopatra was said to have bathed in donkey milk, and a Nilometer, which measured the reach of the Nile floods.

Secret entrance for priests at the Temple of Kom Ombo, Egypt

Secret entrance for priests

Cleopatra's bath at the Temple of Kom Ombo, Egypt

Cleopatra’s bath

Nilometer at Kom Ombo in Egypt

Nilometer

Outside the entrance to the temple sits the Crocodile Museum. Around 300 crocodile mummies were discovered in the area and a select few are on display.

Crocodile Museum at Kom Ombo, Egypt

Crocodile Museum

Crocodile Museum at Kom Ombo in Egypt

Crocodile Museum

Crocodile Museum at Kom Ombo in Egypt

Crocodile Museum

The museum highlighted the mummification process for crocodiles. This was extremely interesting to me and the rest of the group.

Crocodile Museum at Kom Ombo, Egypt

Crocodile Museum

Crocodile Museum at Kom Ombo, Egypt

Crocodile Museum

After Kom Ombo, it was back to the cruise ship. I had dinner and drinks with my tour friends as we began our overnight ride to Edfu.

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